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Neuromarketing and Web Persuasion

Roger Dooley presented at this morning's MIMA event. Neuromarketing was the topic, and the author of Brainfluence didn't disappoint.

Marketing Honesty and Trust

Despite the constant stories in the news about corrupt CEOs, 90% of folks trust CEOs while only 20% trust CMOs. While I don't think we marketers deserve that reputation, it's no wonder most marketing fails. Enter the secret weapon: Neuromarketing.

Roger Dooley explains the distrust of marketers despite CEO corporate corruption and scandals. 

Roger Dooley explains the distrust of marketers despite CEO corporate corruption and scandals. 

Marketing + Neurology = Neuromarketing

Science of the brain has advanced considerably in the last 15 years. EEG and fMRI machines can map brain activity when someone is exposed to media.

Tools like Affectiva and realeyes can even map facial expressions over the web to draw meaning out of subtle changes in your eye movement. Implicit association tests exist that can draw conclusions about your character based on what comes to mind.

If you haven't heard of any of these new technologies, it's time to look at some of the neuro nudges you can use to increase conversion rates and customer happiness.

Roger Dooley demonstrated a fascinating clip that showed eye tracking and brain activity of a person exposed to a TV ad.

Roger Dooley demonstrated a fascinating clip that showed eye tracking and brain activity of a person exposed to a TV ad.

Neuro Nudges

Certain principles are shown to drive positive consumer responses in the brain. Here's a healthy handful of neuro nudges that Roger shared with the crowd of around 250:

  • Liking - Establishing affinity with your customer is a sure-fire way to get them to like you. If your customers have dogs, consider pictures of happy people at your company with dogs. This is a literal example Roger used during the presentation, but there are far more subtle ways of using like to your advantage.
  • Setting Expectations - People enjoy a product more if they're given a realistic expectation of what their experience will contain. Set lofty, yet realistic expectations for peole and they'll likely enjoy your product more.
  • Fairness - Roger asked two audience members to make a deal to split $10. He pointed out that the fairness of the deal carried a lot of weight with each participant, and that socializing before making a deal increases the fairness. Tip: if you're negotiating business, go out to dinner first and then talk business.
  • Doppelgänger Effect - One of the best ways to get someone to buy something is to help them envision themselves using the product. Roger used the example of taking an opt-in social profile picture and inserting it into a dynamic ad. Mirror neurons vicariously enjoy what they see, and nudge your brain to purchase what it sees as possible.
  • Rudeness - Just like in real life, rudeness sparks revenge. As we've seen from countless brands, a quick and sincere apology is often all it takes to insulate a brand against social backlashes.
  • Scarcity - People are more likely to act if they think a deal won't be available in the future. Scarcity drives conversion -- limited quantities, timeframes or offers all induce the scarcity effect.
  • Gender - Men think more short term and grow impatient when shown a picture of an attractive woman. They also show riskier behavior. These "mating triggers" can be very effective on men but not so much with women.
  • Cognitive Fluency - This means that you associate difficulty of tasks with the difficulty of the instructions. Make your fonts and explanations simple of you're asking for a simple action from your customers. Conversely, use a more complex font if you have an expensive or complex product to convey higher value and/or importance.

Always Changing

Our industry changes every day, but our brains have remained largely the same for 50,000 years. Take some time to learn about the principles that make us all tick. Your marketing and your customers will thank you.

Were you at the MIMA event this morning? What was your favorite part of Roger's presentation? What do you find most interesting about the intersections between our brains and marketing?

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